Deliberations of Doom: Episode 7: The Horror Films of John Carpenter Pt 1 | One of Us

Deliberations of Doom: Episode 7: The Horror Films of John Carpenter Pt 1

6 Submitted by on Thu, 27 April 2017, 10:59
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Our horror crew (now calling themselves, The Doom Patrol) may not see eye to eye on every single one of director/writer/composer John Carpenter’s horror movies, but they all agree that he is one of, if not the most, accomplished horror directors ever. So listen to them go down the list of his horror titles and talk about what makes them great, or not so great. Also, we review the oft-compared with Carpenter’s films, The Void, now out on VOD.

You can follow The Doom Patrol on their twitter accounts:
@ProfPatience
@phillipguzman
@SomeVagueIdea
@EvilArchEnemy
@chriscoxcritic
@oneofusnet


http://www.entertainmentearth.com/cjdoorway.asp?url=hitlist.asp?searchfield=funko+legacy


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Born in the wilds of northern Virginia, in 1992 Chris managed to put all of his survival skills to use and barely escaped with his life to Austin Texas, where ever since he’s dabbled in everything from plumber’s assistant to sandwich maker, from band to bar management. An opportunity to see theatrical release films for free, by becoming a critic on a local public access show called “The Reel Deal”, turned into a full time job when Chris and his friends decided to take it to the internet. They built the site Spill.com, adding multiple podcasts and animated features, to no small amount of success. During this time, a fortuitous friendship sprung up between Chris and young Brian Salisbury, who was also a local film critic, and they merged their forces of will, and their laundry list of ideas for shows, to eventually build this paradise you see before you.
  • birdy the critic

    This is probably a controversial Carpenter opinion, but I like The Fog better than Escape from New York. Escape has fewer story problems and its more technically impressive, but Escape from New York bores me because of its dated, difficult to connect with story, unlikable and dull main character, and just the lackluster uninteresting nature of the action scenes. The Fog at least has effective atmosphere and likable characters. Escape from New York is too dull to be a thrilling action film and too ridiculous to be a suspense/thriller movie. As far as I am aware it is the most dated of Carpenter’s good era “classics.”
    The Thing is indisputable though. Best film he will EVER make. Halloween is a contender but it still must bow before The Thing.
    I’m curious about The Void. It sounds like The Fog where the atmosphere and effects are good but the story is a mess. Might check it out.

    • Chris Cox

      You’re right. That is definitely a controversial Carpenter opinion.

  • El Pollo Guerrera

    As a subscriber, I am happy to know that my money is going to help this show be available to everyone.

  • Jordan Hoffman

    Hearing a bit of misinformation as a John Carpenter nut,

    but I don’t care. I love listening to you guys and love hearing people laud this man. Very underappreciated

    • Chris Cox

      I’m curious to know what info you thought was scurrilous. It was all culled from online, and whenever possible, double checked versus information sources, but obviously the capacity for mistakes was there.

      • Jordan Hoffman

        Okay first off let me say I hope I didn’t come off as one of those asshole nerds like “Uhm… actually guys, you’re wrong it’s LeviOsa not Leviosaaaw”

        But actually, I’d even say the errors indicate research on your part, and good sources, it’s just where these sources are getting their info that’s to blame. The one that comes immediately to mind is the idea for Halloween coming from musings of a sequel to Black Christmas.

        The director of Black Christmas likes to tell that story and act as though he had a hand in the conception of Halloween. But the story as told from multiple sources at different periods of time (without even reference to Bob Clark) is that Carpenter and Debra Hill were commissioned to write a film called “The Babysitter Murders” about just that. And it was part-way through pre-production that producer Irwan Yablans suggested setting it on Halloween and using the title “Halloween” since no other horror movie had done it yet.

        Which is partly why when you watch the movie, the setting of “Halloween” feels like such an afterthought.

        Other’n that there’s nothing I find majorly objectible. Just unimportant phrasing here and there (Donld Pleasance suggested and Carpenter shot both versions of Loomis’ reaction to Michael’s disappearance and the “I expected this” reaction was the one chosen. But that’s an unimportant technicality.)